Category Archives for Product Recalls from CPSC.gov

See It Before You Sign It

Blog en Español
Spring is the time when college students and their parents start looking for housing for this fall semester.
Whether you or your college student plan to live in a dorm or in off-campus housing, don’t sign on the dotted line until you see the housing first. It could be a matter of life and death.
Why? Because fires in dorms, fraternities, sororities and off-campus housing kill about seven people every year.  Since 2000, nearly 120 people have died in campus fires, according to a U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) study.
Off-campus housing tops the list for fires.
Most (94 percent) fatal campus fires took place in off-campus housing, according to incidents examined by USFA between 2000 and 2015.
The best advice to keep your college student safe is this: See it before you sign it.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has teamed up with USFA, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Campus Firewatch to help get this warning out. Don’t sign a contract for housing until you see it yourself. That goes for Mom and Dad too. See it, take a housing tour and make sure you look for:
#1 Working smoke alarms
Make sure there are working smoke alarms on every level and inside each bedroom. Smoke alarms save lives. Fire sprinklers add lifesaving protection too.
USFA found that smoke alarms were missing or did not have batteries in 58 percent of fatal campus fires. None of the fatal fire locations had fire sprinklers.
#2 Two ways out of each room for a safe escape. Make sure all windows and doors open easily.
You need to be able to get out if there is a fire. Two ways out are best.
#3 Campus housing that can handle today’s electric power needs.
Laptop computers, phones, televisions and coffee makers take a lot of power. Some older homes may not be able to handle all the electrical demand by today’s students. USFA found that 11 percent of fires were caused by electrical issues.
#4 Be in the know.
Make sure that you or your college student take precautions with smoking materials and alcohol, which the USFA study found to be involved in the majority of the fires. Keep an eye on food when it is cooking. Do not walk away.
College is a time of new and exciting beginnings. “See it before you sign it” for off-campus housing so that a fire doesn’t have a chance to bring college years to an abrupt and devastating end.
Blog en Español
Spring is the time when college students and their parents start looking for housing for this fall semester.
Whether you or your college student plan to live in a dorm or in off-campus housing, don’t sign on the dotted line until you see the housing first. It could be a matter of life and death.
Why? Because fires in dorms, fraternities, sororities and off-campus housing kill about seven people every year.  Since 2000, nearly 120 people have died in campus fires, according to a U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) study.
Off-campus housing tops the list for fires.
Most (94 percent) fatal campus fires took place in off-campus housing, according to incidents examined by USFA between 2000 and 2015.
The best advice to keep your college student safe is this: See it before you sign it.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has teamed up with USFA, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Campus Firewatch to help get this warning out. Don’t sign a contract for housing until you see it yourself. That goes for Mom and Dad too. See it, take a housing tour and make sure you look for:
#1 Working smoke alarms
Make sure there are working smoke alarms on every level and inside each bedroom. Smoke alarms save lives. Fire sprinklers add lifesaving protection too.
USFA found that smoke alarms were missing or did not have batteries in 58 percent of fatal campus fires. None of the fatal fire locations had fire sprinklers.
#2 Two ways out of each room for a safe escape. Make sure all windows and doors open easily.
You need to be able to get out if there is a fire. Two ways out are best.
#3 Campus housing that can handle today’s electric power needs.
Laptop computers, phones, televisions and coffee makers take a lot of power. Some older homes may not be able to handle all the electrical demand by today’s students. USFA found that 11 percent of fires were caused by electrical issues.
#4 Be in the know.
Make sure that you or your college student take precautions with smoking materials and alcohol, which the USFA study found to be involved in the majority of the fires. Keep an eye on food when it is cooking. Do not walk away.
College is a time of new and exciting beginnings. “See it before you sign it” for off-campus housing so that a fire doesn’t have a chance to bring college years to an abrupt and devastating end.

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National Poison Prevention Week 2016

Blog en Español

An estimated 85,000 children younger than 5 are unintentionally poisoned each year in the U.S.
Does that sound like a lot? Wondering how so many children gain access to poisons?
According to a CPSC study, in 2014 thousands of children got their hands on blood pressure medicine. You know the pills in grandma’s purse, in the day-minder container next to the tin of mints. Then there were the kids who found the partially opened bleach container on the kitchen floor next to the bucket of sudsy water.  And for others, it was the colorful and squishy but highly concentrated liquid laundry packet placed atop the load of laundry.
Children access medicines, household chemicals and other potentially harmful products in various ways. The majority, about 76 percent, of unintentional poisonings occur in the home, often with commonly used products.

Preventing unintentional poisoning is not done by luck of the draw, but rather with a plan for protection.
What should parents do? First, identify hazardous products in the home. The Poison Prevention Packaging Act (PPPA), passed by Congress in 1972, requires special packaging for about 30 categories of these products. Child-resistant caps on medicines and on household cleaners are a good indicator that the product can present a poison risk.
Store these products up high, out of a child’s sight and reach. And remember, the special packaging cannot work if it is not used properly. Always completely re-seal hazardous products after each use.
Since the PPPA was passed in 1972, child fatalities as a result of unintentional poisonings have declined significantly, from about 216 a year to about 32.
Yet, there are still emerging hazards that need to be addressed. Between January 1 and May 31, 2015, the American Association of Poison Control Centers received nearly 1,500 reports of child exposure to hazardous liquid nicotine. In February 2016, President Obama signed the Child Nicotine Poisoning Prevention Act into law, requiring child-resistant containers for liquid nicotine.  CPSC is taking steps to implement this important child safety law.
Poison dangers are presented by the more familiar hazards and innocuous products alike. To reduce the risk of unintentional poisoning incidents, remember to safely store medicines, household cleaners and other chemicals in the home.
Here are a few tips and resources to help:

First. Always use and re-seal child safety caps.
Next. Lock up poisons and medicines up and keep them out of a child’s sight and reach.
Last. Keep the Poison Help hotline number 1-800-222-1222 nearby. Call your local poison center in case of poison emergency.

Think Outside the Box: Watch this video for help identifying and addressing hidden poisoning dangers in the home.
Blog en Español

An estimated 85,000 children younger than 5 are unintentionally poisoned each year in the U.S.
Does that sound like a lot? Wondering how so many children gain access to poisons?
According to a CPSC study, in 2014 thousands of children got their hands on blood pressure medicine. You know the pills in grandma’s purse, in the day-minder container next to the tin of mints. Then there were the kids who found the partially opened bleach container on the kitchen floor next to the bucket of sudsy water.  And for others, it was the colorful and squishy but highly concentrated liquid laundry packet placed atop the load of laundry.
Children access medicines, household chemicals and other potentially harmful products in various ways. The majority, about 76 percent, of unintentional poisonings occur in the home, often with commonly used products.

Preventing unintentional poisoning is not done by luck of the draw, but rather with a plan for protection.
What should parents do? First, identify hazardous products in the home. The Poison Prevention Packaging Act (PPPA), passed by Congress in 1972, requires special packaging for about 30 categories of these products. Child-resistant caps on medicines and on household cleaners are a good indicator that the product can present a poison risk.
Store these products up high, out of a child’s sight and reach. And remember, the special packaging cannot work if it is not used properly. Always completely re-seal hazardous products after each use.
Since the PPPA was passed in 1972, child fatalities as a result of unintentional poisonings have declined significantly, from about 216 a year to about 32.
Yet, there are still emerging hazards that need to be addressed. Between January 1 and May 31, 2015, the American Association of Poison Control Centers received nearly 1,500 reports of child exposure to hazardous liquid nicotine. In February 2016, President Obama signed the Child Nicotine Poisoning Prevention Act into law, requiring child-resistant containers for liquid nicotine.  CPSC is taking steps to implement this important child safety law.
Poison dangers are presented by the more familiar hazards and innocuous products alike. To reduce the risk of unintentional poisoning incidents, remember to safely store medicines, household cleaners and other chemicals in the home.
Here are a few tips and resources to help:

First. Always use and re-seal child safety caps.
Next. Lock up poisons and medicines up and keep them out of a child’s sight and reach.
Last. Keep the Poison Help hotline number 1-800-222-1222 nearby. Call your local poison center in case of poison emergency.

Think Outside the Box: Watch this video for help identifying and addressing hidden poisoning dangers in the home.

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Change Time, Change Batteries – A Habit That Can Save Your Life

Blog en español
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Spring is right around the corner, so you know what that means – spring forward when changing the time on your clocks. Daylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 13. This weekend is also a good time to take steps to make sure your household is prepared for emergencies. In addition to turning the time on your clocks one hour ahead, CPSC is urging consumers to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms.
“A few minutes spent preparing for an emergency in your home can keep you out of the emergency room,” said CPSC Chairman Elliot F. Kaye. “Fresh batteries in smoke and CO alarms can be lifesaving.”
Unless you have 10-year batteries, the batteries in alarms should be replaced every year. Alarms should be tested monthly to make sure they are working properly. CO is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas that consumers cannot see or smell. Working smoke and CO alarms can help protect your family from a fire or carbon monoxide (CO) hazard in your home. Every home needs working alarms to provide an early warning.
Smoke alarms should be placed on every level of your home, outside sleeping areas and inside bedrooms. CO alarms should be installed on every level of the home and outside each sleeping area.
Between 2010 and 2012, there was an average of 360,400 unintentional residential fires, resulting in about 2,200 deaths, 13,000 injuries and nearly $6.5 billion in property damages each year.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 1999 and 2010, an average of 430 non-fire carbon monoxide deaths occur annually.
According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), approximately three out of five fire deaths occur in homes with no smoke alarms or homes without working smoke alarms.
Remember, almost every day a smoke and CO alarm saves somebody’s life. Preparing and practicing an escape plan can buy your family valuable time to escape from a fire or dangerous level of carbon monoxide.
Blog en español
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Spring is right around the corner, so you know what that means – spring forward when changing the time on your clocks. Daylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 13. This weekend is also a good time to take steps to make sure your household is prepared for emergencies. In addition to turning the time on your clocks one hour ahead, CPSC is urging consumers to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms.
“A few minutes spent preparing for an emergency in your home can keep you out of the emergency room,” said CPSC Chairman Elliot F. Kaye. “Fresh batteries in smoke and CO alarms can be lifesaving.”
Unless you have 10-year batteries, the batteries in alarms should be replaced every year. Alarms should be tested monthly to make sure they are working properly. CO is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas that consumers cannot see or smell. Working smoke and CO alarms can help protect your family from a fire or carbon monoxide (CO) hazard in your home. Every home needs working alarms to provide an early warning.
Smoke alarms should be placed on every level of your home, outside sleeping areas and inside bedrooms. CO alarms should be installed on every level of the home and outside each sleeping area.
Between 2010 and 2012, there was an average of 360,400 unintentional residential fires, resulting in about 2,200 deaths, 13,000 injuries and nearly $6.5 billion in property damages each year.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 1999 and 2010, an average of 430 non-fire carbon monoxide deaths occur annually.
According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), approximately three out of five fire deaths occur in homes with no smoke alarms or homes without working smoke alarms.
Remember, almost every day a smoke and CO alarm saves somebody’s life. Preparing and practicing an escape plan can buy your family valuable time to escape from a fire or dangerous level of carbon monoxide.

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New ATV Report Shows Fewer Injuries and Reported Deaths

Children younger than 16 still make up about one-quarter of deaths and injuries
Although it may seem a long way off in many areas of the U.S., spring and ATV riding season are just around the corner. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) wants to share some important news and safety reminders to help ATV and ROV riders prepare for a safe 2016 riding season.
First, the numbers in the latest CPSC staff report indicate that there are fewer ATV-related injuries and reported deaths than there were nearly a decade ago.
The 2014 Annual Report of ATV-Related Deaths and Injuries, released January 29, 2016 identifies fewer ATV fatalities in recent years. The estimated number of deaths is about 900 for the year 2007, and about 700 for the year 2011, the most recent year for which death reporting is considered complete. Estimates indicate there have been about 665 ATV-related deaths in 2012 and about 650 in 2013. The numbers for 2012 and 2013 are expected to change in future reports since reporting for these years is still ongoing. Not enough data are available to estimate fatalities for 2014.
Injuries have declined significantly from an estimated 150,900 in 2007 to 93,700 in 2014.
But the news is not all good. CPSC staff found that children younger than 16 still make up nearly one-quarter of all ATV-related deaths reported and children younger than 12 still make up nearly half of the deaths for children younger than 16.
Similarly, although there were fewer ATV-related injuries in 2014 than in 2007, injuries to children younger than 16 continued to make up more than 25 percent of ATV-related injuries.
To help drive these numbers down and keep children safe, CPSC urges the riding community to make safety a part of the plan for every ride and to follow these safety tips:

Never let children ride ATVs that are meant for adults. That means making sure children younger than 16 operate only youth model ATVs appropriate for their age and never allowing children younger than 6 on an ATV.
Make sure children wear a helmet and other protective gear that fits appropriately.

CPSC also warns ATV riders that hands-on training and following these known safety practices can help keep both adults and children safe while using their vehicles:

Do not drive ATVs on paved roads.
Do not drive ATVs with a passenger or ride as a passenger.
Always wear a helmet and other protective gear such as eye protection, boots, gloves, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt.

Further information on ATV safety is available at the ATV Safety Information Center at www.cpsc.gov.
Children younger than 16 still make up about one-quarter of deaths and injuries
Although it may seem a long way off in many areas of the U.S., spring and ATV riding season are just around the corner. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) wants to share some important news and safety reminders to help ATV and ROV riders prepare for a safe 2016 riding season.
First, the numbers in the latest CPSC staff report indicate that there are fewer ATV-related injuries and reported deaths than there were nearly a decade ago.
The 2014 Annual Report of ATV-Related Deaths and Injuries, released January 29, 2016 identifies fewer ATV fatalities in recent years. The estimated number of deaths is about 900 for the year 2007, and about 700 for the year 2011, the most recent year for which death reporting is considered complete. Estimates indicate there have been about 665 ATV-related deaths in 2012 and about 650 in 2013. The numbers for 2012 and 2013 are expected to change in future reports since reporting for these years is still ongoing. Not enough data are available to estimate fatalities for 2014.
Injuries have declined significantly from an estimated 150,900 in 2007 to 93,700 in 2014.
But the news is not all good. CPSC staff found that children younger than 16 still make up nearly one-quarter of all ATV-related deaths reported and children younger than 12 still make up nearly half of the deaths for children younger than 16.
Similarly, although there were fewer ATV-related injuries in 2014 than in 2007, injuries to children younger than 16 continued to make up more than 25 percent of ATV-related injuries.
To help drive these numbers down and keep children safe, CPSC urges the riding community to make safety a part of the plan for every ride and to follow these safety tips:

Never let children ride ATVs that are meant for adults. That means making sure children younger than 16 operate only youth model ATVs appropriate for their age and never allowing children younger than 6 on an ATV.
Make sure children wear a helmet and other protective gear that fits appropriately.

CPSC also warns ATV riders that hands-on training and following these known safety practices can help keep both adults and children safe while using their vehicles:

Do not drive ATVs on paved roads.
Do not drive ATVs with a passenger or ride as a passenger.
Always wear a helmet and other protective gear such as eye protection, boots, gloves, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt.

Further information on ATV safety is available at the ATV Safety Information Center at www.cpsc.gov.

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New Regulatory Robot Tool Released: Enhanced Safety Guidance to Small Consumer Product Businesses on Compliance

We are excited to introduce the Regulatory Robot, an important new tool and a step forward in the way that the CPSC works with small businesses.  The Robot helps companies determine which consumer product safety rules might apply to their product.  The Robot asks small businesses making new products a series of guided interview questions, and, based on the answers, produces a downloadable report.  The report is customized with links to product safety regulations that may apply to the product.  The report also provides important information on labeling, certification, and testing requirements.
The Robot, working in concert with the agency’s other efforts to educate small businesses, will increase the overall level of consumer product safety in the United States.
With the strong support of Chairman Elliot F. Kaye and the Commission, Small Business Ombudsman Neal S. Cohen, and other agency staff developed this new tool for small businesses wishing to compete and bring safe consumer products to market.
“The CPSC is committed to using all available resources to protect consumers from unsafe and non-compliant products, and this new and innovative online tool is reflective of our commitment,” said Chairman Kaye.  “The Regulatory Robot is built for everyday small businessmen and women who need an easy and practical tool to help them stay in compliance with federal safety rules.  It is far better to know and follow our rules before a product is made or imported, instead of us catching an unsafe product after the fact. ”
Why is this new tool noteworthy?
While information about CPSC rules and regulations has been available for years in a piecemeal fashion, this interactive tool is the first time it has been placed in proper context into one place on a government website.
The CPSC needs the cooperation and collaboration of small businesses to make sure that all consumer goods in the hands of American consumers are safe and compliant.
Why did the CPSC develop the Regulatory Robot?
Many small businesses seek assistance from our agency, through the Small Business Ombudsman and the Office of Compliance and Field Operations, and express a strong willingness to comply with our safety requirements – but they often cannot simply figure out how to do it.  Prior to the Robot, we handled questions from small businesses through individualized phone calls to staff, an approach that challenged our limited resources.  Small businesses will now have direct access to these requirements – and the Small Business Ombudsman and Office of Compliance and Field Operations will continue to be available for additional questions.
We believe that the Robot will lead to safer, compliant products, fewer deaths and injuries to American consumers, and help us further meet our mission.  We believe that the Robot offers an excellent ‘safety’ return on our investment, and we hope to see it evolve and grow further during the years with constructive user feedback.
Go ahead and take the Regulatory Robot for a test drive.  And please don’t forget to send us your feedback so we can make it even better.
We are excited to introduce the Regulatory Robot, an important new tool and a step forward in the way that the CPSC works with small businesses.  The Robot helps companies determine which consumer product safety rules might apply to their product.  The Robot asks small businesses making new products a series of guided interview questions, and, based on the answers, produces a downloadable report.  The report is customized with links to product safety regulations that may apply to the product.  The report also provides important information on labeling, certification, and testing requirements.
The Robot, working in concert with the agency’s other efforts to educate small businesses, will increase the overall level of consumer product safety in the United States.
With the strong support of Chairman Elliot F. Kaye and the Commission, Small Business Ombudsman Neal S. Cohen, and other agency staff developed this new tool for small businesses wishing to compete and bring safe consumer products to market.
“The CPSC is committed to using all available resources to protect consumers from unsafe and non-compliant products, and this new and innovative online tool is reflective of our commitment,” said Chairman Kaye.  “The Regulatory Robot is built for everyday small businessmen and women who need an easy and practical tool to help them stay in compliance with federal safety rules.  It is far better to know and follow our rules before a product is made or imported, instead of us catching an unsafe product after the fact. ”
Why is this new tool noteworthy?
While information about CPSC rules and regulations has been available for years in a piecemeal fashion, this interactive tool is the first time it has been placed in proper context into one place on a government website.
The CPSC needs the cooperation and collaboration of small businesses to make sure that all consumer goods in the hands of American consumers are safe and compliant.
Why did the CPSC develop the Regulatory Robot?
Many small businesses seek assistance from our agency, through the Small Business Ombudsman and the Office of Compliance and Field Operations, and express a strong willingness to comply with our safety requirements – but they often cannot simply figure out how to do it.  Prior to the Robot, we handled questions from small businesses through individualized phone calls to staff, an approach that challenged our limited resources.  Small businesses will now have direct access to these requirements – and the Small Business Ombudsman and Office of Compliance and Field Operations will continue to be available for additional questions.
We believe that the Robot will lead to safer, compliant products, fewer deaths and injuries to American consumers, and help us further meet our mission.  We believe that the Robot offers an excellent ‘safety’ return on our investment, and we hope to see it evolve and grow further during the years with constructive user feedback.
Go ahead and take the Regulatory Robot for a test drive.  And please don’t forget to send us your feedback so we can make it even better.

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